Archive for the ‘Orygun’ Category

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Small bottle, big taste!

I really liked this 90 point wine…but I have to drop it a bit. It was too green for me, this bottle had a lot of herbal notes followed up by cherry. Old world fans would love this! The floral notes where just a little off balance from the fruit. Although it was definitely a treat.
Score: 89/100

Paired it with Pita bread chicken pizza with tomato sauce.

So my first experience with Pinot Gris…and I see the reason why people love these wines with seafood. The crispness and freshness is better than a cold 7up on a hot day!

Here is some info from Eola’s site

GOLD MEDAL – NEWPORT SEAFOOD AND WINE FESTIVAL 2007 SILVER MEDAL – ASTORIA WINE AND FOOD FESTIVAL 2007 Fresh Bartlett Pears come to mind when you first inhale the delicious aroma. At first taste, it is light, refreshing, and a little fruity with a light finish. A little spritz on the finish. Delicious with wild sockeye salmon. This Pinot Gris was made exclusively from grapes grown in the Willamette Valley. Aged only in stainless steel to allow the fruit flavors to come forward. Similar in style to the Pinot Grigio’s from Italy.

I have to say this wine was pretty one dimensional at first, but quickly grew in flavor by adding some mineralization and crispness that I loved. I loved the fruit and the freshness that it gave my mouth.

Over all I would have to say that for a first shot at Pinot Gris, this was great.

Since this is only like the second white wine I have tried I can’t really base my score off too much. However, with chicken kabobs this stuff brought the thunder. Also for $9.99 at the local Fred Meyer’s you can’t beat it, can ya?

Score: 89/100

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Being the the first Oregon wine on a site with Oregon in the title… I thought a tribute would be nice.

Oregon, My Oregon
Words by J.A. Buchanan
Music by Henry B. Murtagh

Land of the Empire Builders, Land of the Golden West;
Conquered and held by free men, Fairest and the best.
On-ward and upward ever, Forward and on, and on;
Hail to thee, Land of the Heroes, My Oregon.

Land of the rose and sunshine, Land of the summer’s breeze;
Laden with health and vigor, Fresh from the western seas.
Blest by the blood of martyrs, Land of the setting sun;
Hail to thee, Land of Promise, My Oregon.

Domaine Drouhin Pinot Noir 2004

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90 Points – Josh Raynolds – International Wine Cellar

“Deep red with a bright rim. Pungent, spicy and cool on the nose, with fresh raspberry, wild strawberry, mocha and fresh rose scents. Youthful, tangy red berry flavors are elegant and focused, with mineral and floral pastille accents. Nicely silky pinot, finishing on a sweet red berry note, with a hint of fresh bay.

$19.98 at Winelibrary

Mahi Sauvignon Blanc 2006

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93 Points – Gary Vaynerchuk

“This wine blew me away, I can honestly say this is my new favorite New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc. The outrageous complexity of grapefruit and kiwi mixed with the acidity of a $50 Riesling makes this the winner it is!!”

 $16.99 at Winelibrary

Bottoms up!

Wine Press Northwest Reports

First container of Oregon wine arrives in China

By The Associated Press

Published Thursday, December 9th, 2004

PORTLAND – The first container of premium Oregon Pinot Noir arrived in Beijing last week, marking the opening of a new frontier for the state’s cadre of vintners.

It began as a chance encounter between Henry Estate Winery’s Doyle Hinman and a wine-savvy Chinese businessman at a red-wine tasting in Bordeaux, France, last year. It finished with the arrival in China of 1,250 cases of Oregon’s signature wine.

“When people talk about China’s booming economy, they aren’t lying,” said Hinman, the Roseburg-based winery’s sales and marketing director. “If we can get just a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of their 1.3 billion people to buy our wines, it will be huge business for us.”

American Pacific Group, a Portland trade and export company, is playing a pivotal role in the arrangement. Using its expertise in trade with Chinese companies, it buys the wine and then ships it to ports near Beijing and Shanghai. The company then oversees distribution and sales to high-end restaurants and luxury hotels around the country.

“No question there’s a big learning curve involved,” Terry Protto, one of the company’s four partners, told The Oregonian newspaper. “But our knowledge of the business landscape in China means we can get it in, get it paid for and get it sold, no matter what the product is.”

Last year, international exports amounted to only 3.5 percent of the state’s $200 million in wine sales, according to the Oregon Wine Board. Japan, Canada, the United Kingdom and France claimed the bulk of that business. China, by contrast, didn’t buy enough wine to merit its own listing on year-end export reports.

Meeting the goal of one cargo container per month would likely propel China to No. 1 among Oregon’s international export customers, said Katie Stoll, who manages the wine board’s export program.

A single monthly container would propel total yearly sales in China to 15,000 cases, surpassing the 13,908 sold to Japan last year, she said. Canada, Oregon’s second-largest buyer of exported wine, bought 11,269 cases in 2003. The United Kingdom and France combined to buy 5,356 cases.

The first container, which arrived in China last week, carried Pinot Noir produced by Henry Estate, King Estate and Amity Vineyards. All three were among 14 Oregon producers who traveled in May with Protto and other American Pacific Group executives to attend wine tastings in Beijing.

Plans are for the next container, expected to leave Jan. 15, to carry Pinot Noir from all 14 participating wineries, Protto said.

If their efforts meet with continued success, other Oregon vintners will benefit, said Henry Estate’s Hinman.

“As far as we know, no one else is blazing this trail,” he said. “Not California, not Washington, not anybody. Once we establish Oregon as the preferred brand for high-end Pinot Noir, we believe a lot of others will be able to follow.”